Software Tailor spams blogs. Software Tailor uses questionable business practices. Software Tailor uses unethical search engine optimisation techniques. Software Tailor should cease these counterproductive techniques and focus on more productive lines of business.

I don't usually call out people this way. This is basically a rant about comment spam and not as much about Software Tailor, so you may be wondering why am I calling them out, even on headline and URL. And the above babble will probably sound banal to readers with normal brains. But since Software Tailor uses unethical search engine optimisation techniques, I have employed some search engine optimisation of my own. I'm also interested of seeing what kind of people come read this blog - perhaps there's a lot of other irate bloggers who have heard enough of Software Tailor and their relentless spam campaign.

I use Mollom for spam filtering on my web sites. They're extremely good at that stuff, and have, as of writing, rejected 105980 pieces of spam on both of my websites (beastwithin.org and avarthrel.org) over the past year. I only need to report about 10 to 20 spams by hand every week.

The fact that I got over a hundred thousand pieces of spam is fucking mindboggling.

And remember, both of my websites are really small personal websites that have absolutely no clout in Google. And I actively keep fighting and discouraging spam, so this site is even worse target for spam. Yet, since it's all done by bots, they obviously don't care.

I'm not a particularly inciteful blogger. I only get a handful of legitimate comments on both of my sites every few months. I actually keep my eye on the unverified comments. I have lots of time for this shit.

Since Mollom is so good, I get to focus on the spammers who actually do their darnest to go through the spam filter. Which involves actually going to the website with a browser by hand and posting a comment and going through the CAPTCHA verification.

And one of the most persistently and tenaciously spamming companies is a Hong Kong company called Software Tailor.

According to my visitor logs, they're actually coming here using a real web browser and everything, and posting comments like this:

Yep. They actually employ real people to came all the way to both of my insignificant and totally useless webpages, repeatedly, dozens of times over the past few months, and posted these comments by hand.

As an unemployed programmer and web developer, it slightly pisses me off that there are companies out there actually offering jobs to people to do highly unethical and counterproductive stuff like this. And I'm not alone - there's lots of unemployed IT people in Oulu (gee, thanks a lot again, Nokia!) and if spamming was actually a viable business strategy, you wouldn't see us sitting here unemployed, no? This is basically a no-brainer issue in professional ethics, really. You don't spam people. It's not that hard to grasp. Over the years, I've seen some job offers through unofficial channels that basically sound like spamming, and yeah, it doesn't take too much to figure out why this sort of jobs aren't being offered through the employment agencies. Because people have professional ethics and stuff.

So, Software Tailor - and every other company that does this - should cut this out and have every engineer doing something actually productive. Nah, that'd make sense. Instead, they've employed people to spend time spamming on some random nobody's blog. I have no words.

Of course, it's even funnier that they try to post this crap on this website, because as of yet, I've not managed to make comments even visible for non-admin users. So the comments can't be seen anyway.

If Software Tailor wishes me to publish additional comments on this matter, please post normal comments (they might get eaten by spam filter, though) or contact me at wwwwolf@iki.fi. At very least, I - and my fellow bloggers everywhere in the world - expect them to cease the spamming campaign and publish some kind of a statement against such business practices. Seriously, guys, it's not that hard!