In April 25th, Debian 8.0 Jessie was released.

This was a huge change for my systems. I've been running Debian on my desktop/server PC since Valentine's day 1997 - and upgrades have always gone pretty damn smoothly (never gotten the system hosed, though sometimes I've had interesting peculiarities). For a long time, I actually used Debian Unstable. Before Debian 8 came, I decided to switch to Debian Testing, and go for Debian's stable releases from then on.

I also used to run Ubuntu (with XFCE) on my EeePC netbook, but I decided to switch to Debian 7 Wheezy - and it's now properly upgraded to Jessie too. My current work computer is an Asus laptop running Windows 8.1, and I also have Debian on a VirtualBox virtual machine. (Pro tip: if you're upgrading from Wheezy, be sure to enable contrib to get VirtualBox 4.3 guest add-ons. This was the only thing that broke for me.)

Given that I've been using Wheezy on netbook and VirtualBox for a while and Testing on the desktop/server, I've essentially used stable Debian for a while.

I really like the life here.

I think I've learnt one important lesson: Things can be fixed. Debian Unstable was always creaking on the seams, and I never had the energy to fix it. I have no idea if this is related to my depression or what, but I kind of got into some kind of weird-ass complacency about things being slightly broken all the time. Mustering the effort to go out and fix things is actually pretty awesome.

So now I have three Linux systems running perfectly working operating systems. I have eradicated the ancient evil scourge known to some as sysvinit. Shit boots up. Shit shuts down. Shit works. And it will keep working until the next release, and after that, things will inexplicably continue working. Yay.

So congratulations to the Debian team for getting a fantastic and modern stable version of Debian out. Some of the apps that I've been using recently are working even more flawlessly than they did in Wheezy (for example, FocusWriter actually does full fullscreen now, it used to be confused by XFCE panels). It takes me back to the happy days when I still used GNOME 2 and everything bloody well worked.

screenfetch output on desktop/server, netbook, and VirtualBox.